TRAILS, TALES & FAMILY TIES

While some physical Metis history has been destroyed by fire or falling too far into disrepair, many wonderful old buildings, past haunts, and spectacular views still abound. 

While oral histories may not be as reliable in terms of dates or precise details, they best capture the feeling of a way of life, whether it was the 1870s or the 1970s. These tales, captured through recorded reminiscences, letters, and photos, make you feel the history of the time.

The land – some of which has remained in the same family for over six generations – and memories continue to bind families and the community together.

To help put the places you see along the trails, the tales, and the family histories into chronological context, please enjoy this short bilingual booklet – Metis 1818-2018 200 Years in Time / 200 ans d’histoire – a handy companion as you step into history.

Please share with us your ideas of places, stories or family history related to Metis to add to this section by contacting Pam Andersson, (418) 936-3239, ext. 221, pandersson@heritagelsl.ca.  

 

* We also gratefully accept photos, documents, and other memorabilia relating to the area and its people into our archives; Pam would be pleased to discuss whether you would like us to scan and return items to you or to donate them to Heritage.

TRAILS

The Trails offer spectacular natural and fascinating man-made views, which visitors can enjoy via lookouts or the road without disrupting the environment or neighbours. Combining images, text, and recordings, the Trails’ objective is to allow visitors to see, hear, feel, and yes – even smell (sea grass, salt air, freshly baked cinnamon rolls) –this region’s heritage.

TALES

Like all stories, tales are meant to entertain. Like fiction, a tale can be funny, sad, or thrilling.  Unlike a fiction novel, a tale is often a true story – admittedly, sometimes embellished – meant to teach specific lessons, like the community’s values or family history, in a way the audience will remember.

FAMILY TIES

Who are we, if not ties that bind families and generations together?  Extended families and whole communities share recollections that illuminate and combine their separate experiences into a meaningful whole. Families narrate both their best, and sometimes worst, life experiences, and, in this way, pass down their heritage though remembrances from one generation to the next.

Credits:

  • Funding for the Live our Heritage project was generously provided by the Government of Canada
  • Photos: Heritage Lower Saint Lawrence, or as noted
  • Produced by: Heritage Lower Saint Lawrence Live Our Heritage Team
  • With many thanks to: Dozens of community members who shared memories, photos, and memorabilia